Fish balls recipe

Fish balls can be a great easy addition to many meals, kind of like meatballs. Easy to add them to soups, noodle soups, as a side dish, and especially for hot pots. As usual we don’t trust the ones available in the store, so I looked into making them ourselves.

  • 2-3 cups coarse chopped fish. I used tilapia.
  • 1 Tbsp oil
  • 1 Tbsp flour mix
  • 1/2 tsp salt
  • 1 Tbsp sugar
  • Water
  1. Put the chopped fish into the food processor and pulse until finely chopped. Add oil. Add water 1 Tbsp at a time and keep pulsing it until it’s very very mushy and sticky slimy.
  2. Add the flour, salt and sugar while the food processor is on. Low or high speed doesn’t matter. You just need to incorporate the additions. Add more water slowly to make a slimy mixture. (I’m really selling it now, aren’t I?)
  3. Once it’s to the point of looking like the third photo below, it’s about ready. Dump the mixture out into a mixing bowl, so that it’s more easily handled by hand.
  4. Get a pot of water simmering.
  5. Pick up a handful of the mixture and squeeze a ball out with your fist, through your thumb and finger. Scoop it out with a spoon and drop it gently into the simmering water. The ball will sink at first, and then float. When it has been floating for about 30s-1min it’ll be cooked through and ready to scoop out.
  6. Scoop out onto a plate to let cool
  7. Freeze for later, or drop into whatever dish you want. If you want to deep fry them, go right ahead, but wait until they’re cooked down and the surface of the balls are dry before doing so.

Not good seafood

A great investigative series by AP reporters – Seafood from slaves:

Over the course of eighteen months, four journalists with The Associated Press tracked ships, located slaves and stalked refrigerated trucks to expose the abusive practices of the fishing industry in Southeast Asia. The investigation has led to the release of more than 2,000 slaves, and the immediate reaction of major retailers and the Indonesian government.

And listen to the story of how the reporting came to be on the KCRW Good Food show:

Martha Mendoza, a national writer for the AP, takes us back to the moment when she and her colleagues decided to focus their collective investigative reporting lens on the Thai shrimp industry.