On Fat and Sugar

Jill Eisen for the CBC – Fat and Sugar, Part 1

First, fat was the dietary bad guy. We were warned back in the 1980s to cut back on eggs, meat and full-fat dairy to avoid heart disease. So we started eating more bread, rice and pasta and fat-free snacks. But we got sicker and fatter. Now sugar is the bad guy. Contributor Jill Eisen explores the complex, and sometimes contradictory, science of nutrition — and tries to find clarity amidst the thicket of studies and ambiguous research.

There’s also a great list of research references and a reading list at the link, for more information.

Part 2 airs on June 22, 2016.

Pig farming and transportation

On CBC’s The Sunday Edition – Is it a crime to give a pig water on a hot day?:

When the thermometer hit 28 degrees last summer, Anita Krajnc pushed a water bottle into a truck-load of pigs on their way to slaughter. Krajnc was charged with criminal mischief. Public outrage and concern over animal welfare blew up, and Krajnc became an international hero.

What are good eggs?

Marketplace –  Egg crackdown: are ethical eggs actually better?:

“Nest-laid,” “free-run,” “free-range” and “organic”: Egg cartons hold a lot of big promises about what’s inside and how they got there. We test the marketing on supermarket eggs, and ask companies if we can see for ourselves what the labels really mean for chickens and for you.

Hardly scientific, but it does show that people have many different tastes and considerations when choosing eggs.

What makes for good eggs? For that matter, what about good meats, good fruits and vegetables, and good processed foods?

Sports drinks

CBC Marketplace – Sports drinks unnecessary, counterproductive for most people:

Sports drinks promise to rehydrate, provide energy to muscles in the form of sugar and replenish electrolytes lost during exercise. Canadians guzzle more than $450 million in sports drinks every year.

To test how many electrolytes are actually lost during exercise, Marketplace recruited a team of recreational runners and tested their blood before and after a 45-minute run. None of the runners depleted either their glucose or electrolyte levels enough to require a sports drink to replenish them. In many cases, electrolyte and glucose levels increased in the blood. The test revealed that they could have benefited from water alone.

Protein bars are also largely unnecessary.

Watch the video: Farther, Faster, Fitter?