Yellow pepper paprika

I found some long yellow peppers on the discount rack* at the nearby grocery store and figured it might be interesting to see what they tasted like dried. They were long yellow peppers, relatively sweet to the taste.

I cut them in half, took out the seeds, then laid them on a few sheets of our dehydrator trays. It took about 12 hours of drying at the 135F setting to fully dry.

After that, I broke them up into smaller pieces to fit into our mortar and I crushed them just enough to easily store in a mason jar. I plan to crush these into finer dust or crumbs before use. The smell is sweet and much stronger than store-bought red paprika. I haven’t tasted it yet.

Gochujang – days 2-5+6

Technical issues prevented me from posting every day, so here’s days 2-5, including the final mix.

Day 1 – stir the brown rice and water mixture with chopsticks. There are faint smells of fermentation, a light sour note and a bit musty. But it’s probably not even near the point where the “good” bacteria have taken over (if that happens). I’ll feed it tomorrow.

Day 1 – Brown rice ferment

Day 2 – Stir with chopsticks. Discard 300g of the mixture and add 150g each of more rice flour and water. Mix well.

Day 2 – Brown rice ferment

Day 3 – mix, discard, feed as before.

Day 3 – Brown rice ferment

Day 4 – mix, discard, feed as before.

Day 4 – Brown rice ferment

Actually, before discarding the Day 4 ferment, I saved 200g and used it per the Ideas in Food recipe:

  • 200 g sourdough starter
  • 200 g Korean red chile flakes
  • 200 g water
  • 100 g light brown sugar
  • 35 g salt (I used kosher salt)

Mixed all together and put into a mason jar. It tastes quite good here, with a mix of salty and sweet. The fermented brown rice didn’t seem to be present here. Perhaps I should have waited another day or two?

Gochujang mixed and packed

Today is Day 6 – and it looks and smells quite the same as in the photo above. I stuck a chopstick in there to remove some of the air bubbles in the packed jar and mix it up a bit more. I’m hoping there will be some gas release and a bit more sourness to the mixture over the next few days.

Gochujang – my attempt at an allergy friendly version

Today starts my venture into making gochujang, that spicy, tangy fermented paste used in many Korean foods. I’ve been thinking about trying to make it for several weeks now, and have been reading up on whatever I can find on it around the web. Based on a search, it typically includes the following ingredients:

  • Korean red chili powder/flakes
  • Fermented soy bean powder
  • Milled malt barley powder
  • Sweet rice powder
  • Salt
  • Sugar (in various possible forms)
  • Water

The problem is that it has soy, and barley may be contaminated with traces of wheat. What if I could find replacements for the soy and barley? Maybe if I figured out the constituent parts of the soy and barley in terms of protein and carbohydrate percentages I could mix something similar.

I started some preliminary calculations for other easily available beans, then I found a simple version of gochujang made by the people at Ideas in Food using the following recipe:

  • 200g gluten free sourdough starter
  • 200g Korean red chili flakes
  • 200g water
  • 100g light brown sugar
  • 35g salt

Now, what’s in their sourdough starter? Sorghum flour and water in equal parts by weight. However, they mention here that they have modified the flour to be a mix of equal parts sorghum and flax meal.

My access to suitable allergy-friendly sorghum is limited, much less in the prices and quantity required for a making a sourdough starter, so I needed find another base flour. I found it in brown rice.

Doing a search on brown rice starters, it typically includes brown rice, water, and a little bit of a bacterial additive such as regular old bread yeast or kefir. I think I’ll try to start mine without the additives. Let’s see if just brown rice and water works. I mixed together the following:

  • 300g brown rice flour
  • 300g water, room temp, filtered through a Brita

The brown rice flour was milled using a Vitamix grinder jar for ~30s to a medium fine grind (the Vitamix isn’t able to do a really fine grind on brown rice for me even if I tamp it and leave it running for over a minute). The filtering through a Brita may also not be needed. It’s just what I had on hand for tap water that was at room temperature.

As for the flax meal, I might try another version of that, in order to give the starter a bit more texture. Flax is much more expensive than brown rice though. So for now I’ll leave it out.

My plan is to see what happens tomorrow and either discard half and feed it after 24 hours, or leave it for another 12-24 hours before the discard/feeding. After about a week, I’ll add the rest of the ingredients to make the gochujang.