Fish balls recipe

Fish balls can be a great easy addition to many meals, kind of like meatballs. Easy to add them to soups, noodle soups, as a side dish, and especially for hot pots. As usual we don’t trust the ones available in the store, so I looked into making them ourselves.

  • 2-3 cups coarse chopped fish. I used tilapia.
  • 1 Tbsp oil
  • 1 Tbsp flour mix
  • 1/2 tsp salt
  • 1 Tbsp sugar
  • Water
  1. Put the chopped fish into the food processor and pulse until finely chopped. Add oil. Add water 1 Tbsp at a time and keep pulsing it until it’s very very mushy and sticky slimy.
  2. Add the flour, salt and sugar while the food processor is on. Low or high speed doesn’t matter. You just need to incorporate the additions. Add more water slowly to make a slimy mixture. (I’m really selling it now, aren’t I?)
  3. Once it’s to the point of looking like the third photo below, it’s about ready. Dump the mixture out into a mixing bowl, so that it’s more easily handled by hand.
  4. Get a pot of water simmering.
  5. Pick up a handful of the mixture and squeeze a ball out with your fist, through your thumb and finger. Scoop it out with a spoon and drop it gently into the simmering water. The ball will sink at first, and then float. When it has been floating for about 30s-1min it’ll be cooked through and ready to scoop out.
  6. Scoop out onto a plate to let cool
  7. Freeze for later, or drop into whatever dish you want. If you want to deep fry them, go right ahead, but wait until they’re cooked down and the surface of the balls are dry before doing so.

Jin Doi Recipe

Typically sesame covered, these ‘mochi’ balls are deep fried and can be empty inside or filled with red bean paste or even a sweet peanut-sugar mix.

  • 400 g glutinous (sweet) rice flour
  • 1 cup brown sugar (dark brown sugar makes the resulting balls darker, lighter makes it lighter coloured)
  • 2 tsp baking powder
  • 1 cup (approx) cold tap water
  • 4-5 Tbsp Red bean paste (optional)

Makes about 20 medium sized (3″ diameter balls)

  1. Mix all dry ingredients together well
  2. Add about 3/4 of the water to the dry mix, stirring to combine. Slowly add in more water to make a dough. The dough should be dry enough to not stick (too much) to your hands too much but also wet enough to stick together and form around a ball of red bean paste.
  3. Split the dough into about 20 balls, about 2-3 Tbsp in size each. Roll each ball smooth and even.
  4. Optional – make a divot in each ball and wrap around a 1/2 tsp of red bean paste.
  5. Fill a pot of oil with at least 2″ (preferably 3″ or a bit more) of oil for deep frying. Heat the oil to 320F.
  6. Deep fry a the balls. When you put the balls in, hold it with chopsticks or tings for about 30s to let the bottom fry a bit and get hard so it doesn’t stick to the bottom of the pot. Don’t crowd the pot. 3-4 frying at a time is plenty. You’ll need room for the next step.
  7. The balls will take about 8-10 mins to fry up. After the 2-3 minute mark the balls will be lightly browned on the outside. Using the back of a spoon, ladle or or other similar device (I used a hot pot strainer), carefully squeeze the balls flat. They will puff back up in a minute. Once they puff back up, squeeze it flat again. Do this several times and the balls will puff up to about an inch larger in diameter than they started.
  8. When the balls are golden brown, take them out and let rest on a rack to drain. Paper towels are okay too. The balls will stay crispy for about a day.
  9. They can be left out on the counter for a day or two. After that, they should be placed in the fridge. They can also be sliced and fried up on a pan to warm up before eating.

Gochujang – days 2-5+6

Technical issues prevented me from posting every day, so here’s days 2-5, including the final mix.

Day 1 – stir the brown rice and water mixture with chopsticks. There are faint smells of fermentation, a light sour note and a bit musty. But it’s probably not even near the point where the “good” bacteria have taken over (if that happens). I’ll feed it tomorrow.

Day 1 – Brown rice ferment

Day 2 – Stir with chopsticks. Discard 300g of the mixture and add 150g each of more rice flour and water. Mix well.

Day 2 – Brown rice ferment

Day 3 – mix, discard, feed as before.

Day 3 – Brown rice ferment

Day 4 – mix, discard, feed as before.

Day 4 – Brown rice ferment

Actually, before discarding the Day 4 ferment, I saved 200g and used it per the Ideas in Food recipe:

  • 200 g sourdough starter
  • 200 g Korean red chile flakes
  • 200 g water
  • 100 g light brown sugar
  • 35 g salt (I used kosher salt)

Mixed all together and put into a mason jar. It tastes quite good here, with a mix of salty and sweet. The fermented brown rice didn’t seem to be present here. Perhaps I should have waited another day or two?

Gochujang mixed and packed

Today is Day 6 – and it looks and smells quite the same as in the photo above. I stuck a chopstick in there to remove some of the air bubbles in the packed jar and mix it up a bit more. I’m hoping there will be some gas release and a bit more sourness to the mixture over the next few days.

Gochujang – my attempt at an allergy friendly version

Today starts my venture into making gochujang, that spicy, tangy fermented paste used in many Korean foods. I’ve been thinking about trying to make it for several weeks now, and have been reading up on whatever I can find on it around the web. Based on a search, it typically includes the following ingredients:

  • Korean red chili powder/flakes
  • Fermented soy bean powder
  • Milled malt barley powder
  • Sweet rice powder
  • Salt
  • Sugar (in various possible forms)
  • Water

The problem is that it has soy, and barley may be contaminated with traces of wheat. What if I could find replacements for the soy and barley? Maybe if I figured out the constituent parts of the soy and barley in terms of protein and carbohydrate percentages I could mix something similar.

I started some preliminary calculations for other easily available beans, then I found a simple version of gochujang made by the people at Ideas in Food using the following recipe:

  • 200g gluten free sourdough starter
  • 200g Korean red chili flakes
  • 200g water
  • 100g light brown sugar
  • 35g salt

Now, what’s in their sourdough starter? Sorghum flour and water in equal parts by weight. However, they mention here that they have modified the flour to be a mix of equal parts sorghum and flax meal.

My access to suitable allergy-friendly sorghum is limited, much less in the prices and quantity required for a making a sourdough starter, so I needed find another base flour. I found it in brown rice.

Doing a search on brown rice starters, it typically includes brown rice, water, and a little bit of a bacterial additive such as regular old bread yeast or kefir. I think I’ll try to start mine without the additives. Let’s see if just brown rice and water works. I mixed together the following:

  • 300g brown rice flour
  • 300g water, room temp, filtered through a Brita

The brown rice flour was milled using a Vitamix grinder jar for ~30s to a medium fine grind (the Vitamix isn’t able to do a really fine grind on brown rice for me even if I tamp it and leave it running for over a minute). The filtering through a Brita may also not be needed. It’s just what I had on hand for tap water that was at room temperature.

As for the flax meal, I might try another version of that, in order to give the starter a bit more texture. Flax is much more expensive than brown rice though. So for now I’ll leave it out.

My plan is to see what happens tomorrow and either discard half and feed it after 24 hours, or leave it for another 12-24 hours before the discard/feeding. After about a week, I’ll add the rest of the ingredients to make the gochujang.

Pork bone broth/stock recipe

Ramen pork broth is famously milky white, and I wanted a way to make the broth without having to go through the trouble of blanching and scrubbing the bones, then keeping the broth at a rolling boil until it was done. I’ve found a way to do it without, yet get the milkyness and extract the full flavour of the bones. Here’s how I do it.

3 lbs pork bones*
10 L water*

  1. Place the bones on a sheet pan, spread out so they’re not all touching. Turn on the oven broiler and put the pan on the rack about 10″ or so below the top heater element. Roast the pork bones in the oven under the broiler until they are nicely browned on all sides. This takes about 30-45 minutes, turning the bones over about halfway through.
  2. Put the bones in a large stock pot and fill it up with water. Bring the pot of water and bones to a boil, then reduce to a simmer or even slightly less. Cover the pot and let it cook for 10-20 hours. I do this over two overnight sessions, leaving the bones and water to cool down in the pot during the day.
  3. Once the broth is finished cooking, there will be a good layer of fat on the top of the golden yellow broth. Skim off the fat into a blender, and place another 2-4 cups of the broth into the blender.
  4. Blend the broth and fat on high or max for one (1) minute. The resulting liquid in the blender will be milky white and bubbly.
  5. Pour the blender mixture back into the stock pot with the rest of the broth and mix it all together.
  6. Strain broth out using a sieve (I don’t bother to use a cheesecloth/fine mesh sieve/tea towel) to remove the larger chunks of meat and bone. Add the broth to soups, drink it plain with a few pinches of salt, or use it to accompany your favourite soup noodles.

Notes:
* This is the ratio I generally use. Feel free to use more or fewer bones to the amount of water.

Pork fat and broth
Pork fat and broth before blending
Pork fat and broth after blending
Pork fat and broth after blending

Brownies recipe*

1 cup + 4 Tbsp rice flour blend**
3/4 cup white sugar
2 1/4 tsp baking powder
1/4 tsp baking soda
1/4 tsp xanthan gum
1 tsp salt
1/2 cup unsweetened cocoa powder
1/3 cup canola oil
1/2 cup unsweetened applesauce
2 Tbsp vanilla extract
1/2 cup hot water or brewed coffee
2 cups chocolate chips (optional)***

Makes about 3 dozen mini cupcakes

  1. Preheat oven to 325°F
  2. Combine and whisk together all dry ingredients in a bowl.
  3. Combine the oil, applesauce and vanilla extract in a large bowl.
  4. Slowly add the dry ingredients to the wet, until combined in a paste. Add in the hot water or brewed coffee and mix until it is all combined. It will be a loose batter consistency.
  5. Put mini cupcake cups into the mini cupcake tray, and fill with about 1 Tbsp of the batter, or until the cup is about 3/4 full.
  6. Bake for 12-15 min, until a toothpick inserted into the middle of a cupcake comes out clean.

Notes:
*Adapted from Babycakes NYC vegan brownies recipe. I use a rice flour blend, plus reduce the amount of oil and sugar.
** The rice flour blend I’ve been using is as follows: 2 cups brown rice flour, 2 cups white rice flour, 2 cups glutinous rice flour, 1 2/3 cups tapioca flour or potato starch.
*** Adding 2 cups of chocolate chips will obviously increase the amount of mix. Plan on cooking another dozen or two mini cupcakes if you add in the chips.

Bacon recipe

Really, I don’t have a bacon recipe to post. There are billions to be found on the internet. (Here’s one.) This is just to say that home-made bacon is better than most anything you can buy. I make my own, partly because it’s so good, partly because it avoids us having to deal with potential food contamination (like so many other things).

1 slab pork belly
Curing salt*
2-3 Tbsp Sugar (optional)
Herbs (optional)

Notes:
* I use Readycure from Canada Compound Corporation, where the ratio is between 20 g per 1 kg of meat, to 12 g per 1 kg meat. Use the lower ratio if you want a less salty end product.

 

Japanese curry spice mix recipe

I was surprised to find out that Japanese curries were made using generally the same spices as Indian curries, considering that the flavours end up being so different. Anyways, here’s my take on an allergen-free Japanese curry mix, from base spices. (Allergen free since the boxed curries usually have dairy and wheat ingredients and possibly other allergens.)

Ratios
3 parts Turmeric
2 parts Coriander
1 part Cumin
1/2 part Cardamom
1/2 part Cinnamon
1/4 part Black Pepper
1/4 part Chili Powder

 

Mushroom Cauliflower Soup Recipe

454 g white button or cremini mushrooms, thinly sliced*
1 head cauliflower roughly chopped – keep greens and stalk if you wish, it’ll all be blended anyways
2-3 cloves of garlic, minced
4 cups waterCanola or other neutral oil for cooking
1 slice bacon – optional
Salt and pepper to taste

8+ servings**

  1. Heat up a pan on medium high, add some oil, and saute the sliced mushrooms until golden brown on both sides. Work in batches with mushrooms only 1 layer deep in the pan.
  2. Put mushrooms in a pot with the cauliflower and garlic (and bacon). Add 4 cups of water, or enough to cover the ingredients in the pot. Add a few pinches of salt to the pot. Bring the mix to a boil and then let simmer for 15 minutes.
  3. Put the cooked mixture into a blender and blend on high until the soup is nice and creamy. Add water if needed, in order to keep the soup blending. You may need to blend the soup in batches. Add salt and pepper to taste.

Notes:
*Old partly dried mushrooms work well in this recipe – I like to check the older/discount racks at the grocery store to see if they have any mushrooms on sale for this recipe.
**This soup freezes well, and I tend to make a lot, freeze it, and have it available for times when I don’t feel like cooking.

Pan Fried Mackerel*

Whole mackerel, about 1 per person depending on the size of the fish
Rice flour to dredge, in a large shallow bowl**
~1/2 cup oil for frying

  1. Clean and gut the mackerel if it hasn’t been done already***
  2. Dredge the mackerel, inside and out, in the rice flour and set aside on a plate
  3. Heat the oil up over medium heat in a large pan, use enough to cover the bottom of the pan about 1/2 cm deep
  4. Once the oil is hot (stick a chopstick end in, and if there are a lot of bubbles coming up, it’s hot enough), gently lay in the mackerel
  5. Fry the mackerel for about 3-4 minutes per side, then take out and drain on a rack or on some paper towels

Notes:
* I know this is a relatively simple recipe, and can be applied to almost any cut of fish, but we like the fishiness and oilyness of mackerel so much I figure I should post it for posterity** You could use any type of rice flour, or rice flour mix
*** I typically buy frozen whole mackerel, which I defrost, clip off the fins, and gut. Check out this quick video for instructions, or search for your own.