Report on Health in Children in Canada

Public Health Agency of Canada publication, published February 24, 2016 – Health Behaviour in School-aged Children in Canada: Focus on Relationships:

Key Finding #11: Healthy Eating

While some concerning dietary habits were reported, there were also some positive findings with respect to healthy eating.

Almost half (46%) of boys and more than one third (37%) of girls reported eating neither vegetables nor fruits once per day or more, while 34% of boys and 42% of girls reported eating both fruits and vegetables once per day or more. Some of these behaviours may be attributable to the food environments that surround young people and the availability and affordability of fruits and vegetables. More positively, reports of soft drink and candy consumption have decreased over time, and reported daily consumption of potato chips, diet soft drinks, and energy drinks was quite low. This lower frequency of consumption was consistent with the Canada Food Guide recommendations on reducing the intake of foods high in fats, sugar, sodium, or calories.

Boys and girls aren’t eating enough fruits or vegetables, but at least they have reduced their consumption of sugary drinks and snacks.

Key Finding #12: Healthy Weights

The epidemic of overweight and obesity is not declining in young Canadians.

Approximately 1 in 3 boys and approximately 1 in 4 girls were classified as overweight or obese by Body Mass Index (BMI; calculated from self-reported height and weight). Up to 25% of girls and 10% of boys were, or thought they should be, on a diet to lose weight. The percentage of young people who perceived that their body was too fat has increased from 28% in 2002 to 32% in 2014. Despite ongoing public health efforts, the prevalence of youth obesity, and the behaviours and feelings surrounding it, remain high and have increased over time.

We need to teach kids about growing food, cooking food and eating food, healthfully.