Canadian Senate report on obesity – first thoughts

The Canadian Senate report – Obesity in Canada – A While-of-Society Approach for a Healthier Canada was released last week:

There is an obesity crisis in this country. Canadians are paying for it with their wallets — and with their lives.

Harsh and sobering. The infographic is good.

Among the more controversial recommendations:

  • Consider a tax on sugar- and artificially-sweetened drinks
  • Ban the advertising of food and beverages to children
  • Immediately update the food guide without industry influence

Sugar Tax?

The Canadian Taxpayer Federation and the Canadian Beverage Association both denounce the recommended sugar tax, claiming that it doesn’t work. Three comments:

  1. The discussion and promotion of such a tax is very helpful and brings some awareness to the issue of high sugar consumption, whether the tax is implemented or not.
  2. We need to look at the sugar content of all processed foods and see if such a tax should be expanded to cover foods with added sugars/sweeteners, natural or artificial. Even foods such as fruit juices, which give us the liquid without any of the fibre of the fruit, need to be reviewed for inclusion.
  3. As with salt, we need guidelines on the recommended maximum daily intake of added sugars, and the report suggests this in the text.

The CBC hosted a short forum discussion on the sugar tax last week.

Restricting food advertising to children

As for advertising, currently the Quebec Consumer Protections Act protects children (under the age of 13) from any commercial advertising:

248. Subject to what is provided in the regulations, no person may make use of commercial advertising directed at persons under thirteen years of age.

1978, c. 9, s. 248.

249. To determine whether or not an advertisement is directed at persons under thirteen years of age, account must be taken of the context of its presentation, and in particular of

(a) the nature and intended purpose of the goods advertised;
(b) the manner of presenting such advertisement;

(c) the time and place it is shown.

The fact that such advertisement may be contained in printed matter intended for persons thirteen years of age and over or intended both for persons under thirteen years of age and for persons thirteen years of age and over, or that it may be broadcast during air time intended for persons thirteen years of age and over or intended both for persons under thirteen years of age and for persons thirteen years of age and over does not create a presumption that it is not directed at persons under thirteen years of age.
1978, c. 9, s. 249.
The Senate report calls for a study on the effects of this restriction in Quebec, and for implementation of a similar restriction for all of Canada.

Updating the food guide

The call for updating the food without industry influence is fantastic. I’m not sure how realistic this could be, since many non-industry researchers in academia are funded by industry, so does this mean they can’t be involved? The removal of politics from the food guide is one of the questions I’ve always had, in light of the huge ‘push’ for milk/dairy products as our main recommended calcium intake method.