Onigiri

Cooked japanese (sushi) rice, warm enough to handle by hand*
Bowl of water
Salt (table salt works best, but any other type of unflavoured salt also works)
Roasted seaweed (optional)

Filler Options:
Canned tuna, salmon or other fish, no liquid
Bonito flakes and soy sauce, mixed together to form a paste
Umeboshi (pickled plum)
Cooked ground meat (pork, beef, chicken, turkey, etc) with some salt or soy sauce, the meat should be dry when added to the rice
Spam or other canned meat, chopped into very small pieces
Any other flavourful food, in small bits, and relatively dry (i.e., not mushy) – feel free to experiment

Option 1
Mix filler with the rice – typically only one filler is used in any one rice ball, but feel free to experiment with combinations

Option 2
After step 3 below, make a dent in the rice, stick ~1 teaspoon of filler into the dent, and fold the rice around the filler

  1. Dip fingers in water and spread over both hands, just enough to moisten – this is so that the rice doesn’t stick too much to your hands
  2. Sprinkle a little bit of salt onto one hand
  3. Grab a handful of the rice and filler mix, and form it into a triangular shape – if it’s easier, just form it into a round ball, it doesn’t really matter
  4. Optional – wrap a small piece of roasted seaweed around the rice ball, just before eating, as a place to hold onto the rice ball; don’t put the seaweed on the onigiri until just before eating, or else the seaweed will get soggy – unless you like it that way**

Notes:
* Other types of rice may not stick together quite as well** These rice balls may be eaten warm or cold – if they are cold, the rice will not hold together as well and be a bit messy, but still just as good

Salmon Onigiri